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Healthy Soils Make Healthy Trees

Below the surface of the soil lies a complex soil food web we will likely never see. Without it, much of the plant life we enjoy would not be able to exist. The soil food web consists of many organisms that are beneficial to the health of the soil. This beneficial web is plentiful in an undisturbed forest setting, but can be diminished or lacking in some of the soils we have around our homes where our trees are trying to exist.

Many practices done to soils can disturb this fragile soil food web. Things like compacting the soil, overwatering, lawn treatments, removal of leaves and small branches, etc. can have major impacts on this fragile web. A healthy soil will need organisms like nematodes, beneficial fungi, bacteria, protozoa, arthropods, and certain other animals in order to maintain a favorable growing environment. These organisms play a critical role in nutrient cycling. Nutrient cycling is the process whereby plant materials are broken down into usable nutrients for plants to carry on life. 

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Your Trees are Dormant in Winter - Our Arborists are Not

Wachtel Tree Science works throughout the winter months.  In fact, during the winter we perform many of our services.  We prune and remove trees and shrubs, and even remove stumps. Winters are ideal time to cable, and brace trees, install lighting protection, perform appraisals, consultations and site inspections. With the exception of insect and disease management, winter offers us an additional three months to perform our services.

Winter is an excellent time to work. The benefits are frozen ground, dormant perennials, inactive gardens and defoliated trees. The cold and sterile-like conditions of winter offer us the opportunity to prune trees and shrubs that are susceptible to, or under pressure from insect and disease problems. Trees that have infectious fungal or bacterial disease can have these infected branches pruned out in the winter and greatly reduce the risk of spreading the disease.

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I GOT COLLARD

garden, collards

A few years ago my friend Doug offered to help me plant, care for, and eat from my garden.

“I’d love it,” I said, “but you might not eat much that way! Over 30 years of gardens, and I’ve never had a bumper crop of anything.”
“That’s OK, I just miss gardening.”

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TRAINING PRUNING

The primary objective of pruning young trees is to develop a framework of sturdy, well spaced branches on a strong trunk. Good branch structure, proper form, and tree strength all develop with training pruning.

Pruning done early in a tree’s life removes weak branches and corrects form when branches are relatively small. This reduces the size of pruning wounds, which results in faster closure and less opportunity for decay.

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Do You Have Faith in Your Tree Service?

The old Webster’s dictionary defines faith as being firm to ones promises; contracts and of being worthy of confidence and belief. At Wachtel Tree Science, we work as a team to build and maintain your faith in us as leaders in the tree care industry.

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New at the North Shore Library: E-Readers

Are you wondering if an e-reader is right for you? If so you can now check out an e-reader from the North Shore Library. Thanks to the generosity of the Friends of the North Shore Library we now have two Nooks and two Kindles loaded with a variety of great titles. The e-readers are available for check out at the Circulation Desk. So stop by the North Shore Library and check one out today

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