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Seems a bit unfriendly.

Unfriendly greeting

In a memo emanating from Shorewood Village Hall, residents are being wished happy holidays and best wishes for the new year.

We are also being reminded of a snow code that involves imprisonment up to 90 days.

There seems to be a bit of tyranny in a reminder that public sidewalks must be cleared of snow and ice within 24 hours of the end of the snowfall.

What is going to happen after the first 24 hours that didn't or wouldn't happen during the first 24 hours.

First of all, I've been clearing the snow from the public sidewalk in front of my house for about thirty-five years, sometimes while it was still snowing.

And I didn't know of any of these laws and their penalties. It seems almost cultural to remove the snow. So why are the laws on the books.

Although I have been clearing sidewalks of snow all the time that I've lived in the United States and continue to do this, I often wonder as to why the homeowner should be mandated this outmoded public responsibility.

If the village can't afford to do this, why doesn't it do this for those who do not want to do it and charge the homeowner for it, like property tax?

I hardly use my sidewalk in front of my home, except for little more than for clearing the snow off it, so joggers and dog-walkers from Whitefish Bay can use it.

If I want Shorewood to clear off my sidewalk and charge me for it as a direct expense for living here, why can't I do that, especially when we begin reaching certain age levels and can't get anyone else to do it?

Snow clearing, it is said can causes heart attacks. Everyone seems to know that.

Why should any of us on top of that be threatened with 90 days of imprisonment in order to clear the snow? That or heart attack? Neither is fun to contemplate during this joyous season.

Seems a bit unfriendly, especially now, with a “best wishes for the holiday season” greeting, don't you think, Jolly ol' Saint Nick?

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