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THIS OLD HOUSE.

Towns without patterns.


 

Progress as I see it, is the process of laying new patterns on the existing or previous ones.


 

This concept applies quite specifically to town planning and perhaps more so than it does to any other social or political endeavor.


 

The actual application of new patterns requires the creation of thought that leads to the concept of pattern.


 

Examples of this can be seen where the additions to old houses are visibly incompatible to the total pattern or where there is no commonality  to its various units.


 

Towns that evolve on their own usually present an organic character of order where no overall pattern can be seen. The town is just there.


 

I've observed old towns in England where their organic nature is quite prominently distinct, even more so than in other old European towns.


 

But where a town planner is involved, her/his very presence requires the understanding of “pattern” and the effect that laying this concept of new pattern has on the existing one. And a pattern is more than a cosmetic paste or facade.


 

The nature of pattern is observed by town planners especially in the development of new towns. And I've found that  this process of superimposing one pattern on another is basic to re-planning towns, no matter how small or how large.


 

Without some form of studied knowledge or disciplined understanding of an overall general application of what it takes to make something anew or to renewing it, we find ourselves in a situation somewhat like the old house with all the additions revealing no specific guiding pattern.


 

As one who has assisted other towns in finding this pattern to be applied on the old, there is sort of personal uneasiness in living in one's own town where this knowledge in not being accessed and where there is an established resistance to it.


 

I admire the leaders of our town, that is, our village of Shorewood and am grateful for the time that they take for holding this old house together. They give so much of themselves and of their the time for this purpose. One can not be critical of their generous natures but only be thankful to them.


 

But it is the leaders of towns along with interested citizens that are responsible for searching out the new patterns to satisfy our new needs. Once the pattern that is specific to our village is found, a process for its establishment is then required.  The process is also not easy.


 

At this point we seem only to be making day to day additions to this old house without having developed an overall pattern. But perhaps not much can be done about that but to accept the circumstances.

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